Tag Archives: Glenwood

Halfway Houses are halfway there: Part Two: Money

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This is my second blog about the halfway houses in Anchorage Alaska. Because I only have first hand knowledge of the Glenwood Center (GWC), ran by TJM Western, I will be focusing on the policies and procedures I know about.

What qualifies me?

I spent 14 months at the GWC and had countless conversations and many observations during that time. I will start out by saying the only reason an offender is there on furlough is to work. That is not an issue, believe me, 9.9 out of 10 of us want to get out of prison, where we are making anywhere from .35 to .65 an hour (some were paid $1 or more, but majority rules.) Going to a halfway house helped many save getting out of jail the necessary money for release, which is needed for obvious reasons.

But it isn’t that easy.

First things first. Being in compliance with furlough, which means following GWC policy.

Policy at GWC: You must have a job, working a minimum of 32 hours a week. If you do not have a job meeting the minimum requirements you are liable for an IR (incident report) and possibly a preliminary hearing.

What does that mean? An IR can cause residents to receive extra in-house duties, program demotions, and/or termination from the center. Easy fix, get a job washing dishes or working the drive through at a burger place.

That brings us to the funds request. You might say to yourself, “I won’t need money, they provide everything, right, so I will just bank my money!” Even if you didn’t ever need to take the bus, you still need to get submit one of these. You can get a write-up for not submitting a Resident Funds Request, because without doing so you are not paying for your court fines/restitution. Or, if required, child support. Also, you pay for your phone calls, .50 local, $1.50 for outside of the Anchorage area (the newer cell numbers would be this higher fee), laundry ($1.75 to wash and another $1.75 to dry) and your personal hygiene items as well.

Let’s say you gross $398.78, netting $307.00 from a pay check. $99.70 goes directly to GWC, while another $99.70 goes into a savings reserve you cannot touch until release. In order to pull out any funds to use, you must list your restitution on your funds request, whereas they figure the 20%. Another $79.75 gone. Well, you figure you still have $127 left, right. No, because that $99.70 is in savings, remember. You have $27. This happens each time you get paid, For this example I used my job at Denny’s. I got paid bi-weekly there. Needless to say I walked a lot. And I “threw in” with room mates to get my laundry done.

The short of it? They want their 25% before taxes. And yes, that includes any tips you may receive. Then 25% goes into forced savings, and 20% goes to any restitution an offender may have. Add that up, and 70% is gone before you can even think about pulling money out to do laundry or take the bus. Sure, you get that savings when you leave, but you don’t accrue any interest. You get what you put in.

You might be thinking, okay, interesting, but whats the point Amber?

Lets do the math. If am paying $99.70 twice a month (actually more because that was just from my check at minimum wage, my tips were turned in and divided up just like a check, but for the sake of this exercise we will keep it simple) that is $199 a month. There are about 70 residents at GWC, barring the new ones not working yet and a few short term confined misdemeanents. Even at minimum wage, GWC is getting approximately getting $13K a month (and that is a low estimate). Factor in what Alaska pays to house inmates there –  Alaska spends on average $44,000 a year per inmate  – and it makes me wonder, where is the money going and to what programs is it going to? Staff at GWC are paid $11.75 an hour.

The Alaska Criminal Justice Commission Justice Reinvestment Report – December 2015 summarizes the findings of the Criminal Justice Commission, as a part of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative. The Commission studied the criminal justice system in three areas – pretrial detention, post-conviction imprisonment, and community corrections. Many have heard about this report, but not until I started looking at how much money GWC was being paid to house residents did I stumble upon the actual report.

Recommendation 18: Improve treatment offerings in CRCs and focus use of CRC resources on high-need offenders. CRCs, otherwise known as halfway houses, have the potential to effectively support offenders who are transitioning back to the community from prison. However, the Commission found that CRCs are likely mixing low and high risk offenders, which research has shown can lead to increased recidivism for low risk offenders. Additionally, the Commission found that CRCs would be more effective at reducing recidivism if the facilities offered treatment for offenders in addition to supervision.

Specific Action Recommended: To reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for offenders placed in CRCs, the Commission recommends:
a. Requiring CRCs to provide treatment (cognitive-behavioral, substance abuse, after care and/or support services) designed to address offenders’ individual criminogenic needs.
b. Adopting quality assurance procedures to ensure CRCs are meeting contractual obligations with regard to safety and offender management.
c. Implementing admission criteria for CRCs that:
i. Prioritize placement in CRCs for people who would benefit most from more intensive supervision and treatment, using the results of a validated risk and needs assessment; and ii. Minimize the mixing of low and high risk offenders.

After reading that I am unsure of what programs the CRC was required to provide. I had to earn Level 2 status in order to go to 12 step meetings for my recovery. I signed myself up for MRT classes (interested in learning what this is? Click here) and was told that work was to come first. I asked repeatedly to be able to go to STAR (a non-profit organization providing options, support and information to Alaskans affected by sexual violence) and was almost given a write-up for bringing it up with a GWC casemanager after I questioned why I could not participate in STAR groups. Now, regarding my individual criminogenic needs, I would assume they would want me to address the underlying issues in my “crime”.

I don’t have any clever wrap up to this issue. I would like to have some strong closing argument, but in all truthfulness, this has just raised more questions regarding what can, what could and what should be done to assist the overall positive outcomes for those incarcerated and specifically, those in GWC.

Comments are welcome!

 

 

Halfway houses are halfway there

This is the first of three blog posts I plan on writing about the Halfway Houses in Anchorage, Alaska. 

There are three halfways houses in Anchorage. Community residential centers, CRC’s, to be exact. Midtown and Cordova are now ran by GeoGroup, and Glenwood is owned and operated by TMJ Western. Parkview, owned by GeoGroup as well, closed down last year (2016).

I wanted to sit down and do a few blogs about halfway houses in Anchorage, and where is a better place than to start at the beginning. I went searching for a few key people that were part of the start of CRC’s here in Anchor town.

What I found about the background of CRC’s so far is pretty amazing.

From my limited research thus far, it appears the key player in the creation of halfway houses in Anchorage was William (Bill) Weimar. In the mid 80’s, Weimar saw there was an apparent need for streamlining case management with work release, and embarked on a quest to acquire third party contacts with Alaska Department of Corrections. In 1985 Bill Weimar helped found Allvest Inc. Over time he bought out his partners and grew the company into a multimillion dollar corporation. In 1991, Weimar started another corporation, St. John Investments Inc., which provided contract administrative services to Allvest Inc. At one time Weimar had owned and operated Allvest Laboratories, which did contract urinalysis work, but he sold that company in 1996 to NANA Regional Corporation.

Allvest Inc. led a controversial effort to get the state Legislature to approve a plan that would turn the abandoned Fort Greely Army post into the state’s first private prison. The Legislature approved the proposal and the planning process was under way. The good ol’ boys sat down together and drew out a plan where all would be happy. Money was to be made and strings were to be pulled.

In 1997, Weimar stepped back from overseeing day-to-day operations to focus more on development and corporate expansion. He had hired Frank Prewitt as the company’s new president and chief executive officer. Prewitt had served as commissioner of the state Department of Corrections in 1993 and 1994. The end came in 1998, as detailed in this article from Juneau Empire. Now, I was too young to remember Allvest and the fiasco that sequentially unraveled by the financial liberation it may or may not have took with legislation, but from what I can read thus far, Bill Weimar was a man with a vision, and a heart.

I think I would like the guy if I ever got a chance to meet him. Only via an old friend of his and online articles for research was I able to piece together the legend of this man. This article from ADN, well written by Michael Carey in 2011, shed the most light for me. It sent me on a squirrel chase, looking for the elusive Bill Weimar in order to maybe, just maybe, talk with him. I wanted his thoughts of how he envisioned halfways houses to be, and let him know how far they have fallen from his standard.

No luck.

That is the quick and painless overview of what I was able to find regarding the early days of Anchorage CRC’s.

Now, I will focus on something I personally know about.

The Glenwood Center.

Most people that have never been to a halfway house do not fully understand what the day to day rules and regulations are. I know I had misconception myself until I got to have a very up close and personal understanding of one.

For instance, at Glenwood Center, there is an Orientation Handbook as well as a Resident Handbook. You are identified as a PRISONER not a resident. That is made clear repeatedly. Rules are very similar to Department of Corrections, with similar sanctions as well. One big discrepancy is the staff understanding of the rules they are set to enforce. With a greater window of freedom also comes a greater chance for screwing up. And, lets face it, many of the residents at a CRC did not get there due to making the best choices. Click here for my copies of the Glenwood Resident Handbook and Orientation Handbook.

A halfway house costs the state $99 a day for each inmate, compared to $142 a day for a jail cell.

Looking at the privately ran Glenwood Center, I started the basic search using google.  I was directed to tjmwestern.com which listed an 800 number to report PREA (Prisoner Rape Elimination Act) and states:

The leadership and staff of TJM Western, Inc. (TJMW) have always placed a high priority on creating a safe and healthy environment in which to assist our residents with a successful transition from prison to community.  Our approach to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) is to utilize the legislation to provide additional guidance for us to further foster safe programs built on a culture of respect for the rights of all individuals. 

According to TJ Mahoney & Associates on LinkedIn Founded in 1974, TJ Mahoney & Associates is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to helping prison inmates become responsible, productive members of their communities. Our objective is to improve the likelihood of successful community reentry, thereby reducing recidivism and the long-term financial and social costs of incarceration. We have a successful history of operating programs for both male and female inmates in Nevada, Alaska and Hawaii.

When I contacted a staff member no longer working at Glenwood Center I was able to ask them questions about the dynamics of working for TJM Western. This is an excerpt of our conversation. I am keeping the ex staff monitors name private.

8:02PM

Amber

what up doing my next blog on GWC  looking for insider info anything you wanna pipe in

Ex staff member

As far as….?

Amber

What staff was told about for writeups, how did you find the job, what were people paid, what were the office dynamics, I would nt use any names

Ex staff member

As far as writes goes, you guys know the same as we do except that we’re suppose to do it when we choose not to. Found the job on Craigslist. $11.75 is the pay. Office Dynamics… Lol we’re lucky enough to call it that

Amber

What about with the probation officers, how did they feel about writeups, were any residents ever set apart or off limits…?

Ex staff member

Probation officers encourage write-ups for the problematic residents. As far as I saw, NAME OMITTED was the special one because he always snitched on everyone

Amber

what deemed residents problematic, and did anyone ever talk about how GWC is a privatized halfway house, were any perks offered for catching people doing bad?

Ex staff member

Problematic residents are the ones who pretty much cause problems, never follows the rules, never get any house work done. Everyone knew it was a private company so nobody really asked about it. There wasn’t any perks on catching people at all

Amber

What did you feel was the biggest challenge working there? How did the staff feel about management (COS, casemanagers) and vice versa?

Ex staff member

Biggest challenge was really dealing with both staff and residents. Some residents you know make small mistakes and they wanna throw them in the fire for it. Others do things because they don’t care. We gotta determine what’s the actual situation is. You already know how we felt about management and how unorganized they sometimes are

Ask any previous resident of Glenwood Center and you will quickly understand this is lip service. There is very little assistance with a successful transition from prison to community occurring. There is no one to contact regarding the way the rules are construed from the staff hired on Craigslist at $11.75 an hour, and if you do ask too many questions or make waves, you are quickly reminded that being there is a privilege, not a right.

The only reason an offender is there is to work. You must have a job, working a minimum of 32 hours a week. If you do not have a job meeting the minimum requirements you are liable for an IR (incident report) and possibly a preliminary hearing.

What does that mean?

Depending, a violation can cause one to receive extra in-house duties, program demotions, and/or termination from the center.

Interesting supporting info:

https://www.followthemoney.org/research/institute-reports/alaskas-citizens-lock-out-private-prisons

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/crime-courts/2016/08/07/alaska-halfway-house-population-falls-as-corrections-officials-try-to-tamp-down-walkaways/

https://www.muni.org/Departments/Assembly/legislation/2011%20Ordinances/AO2011-001.PDF

 

http://www.prearesourcecenter.org

Empowerment through Consequence

To finish the moment, to find the journey’s end in every step of the road, to live the greatest number of good hours, is wisdom. –  Ralph Waldo Emerson

I only became aware that I needed to stand up and voice my beliefs after realizing the personal consequences of unfair legislation.

I have been reading up on everything that I was unable to read about for the last three years. Binders, websites, resources. Luckily there is a lot out there.

A big BIG thank you to M. Dante.

I liken it very much to a baby taking her first steps, and peering up a huge stair case…the journey ahead. So, I will research, read, reach out, ponder and look within in order to learn how to continue on this very worthwhile journey before me.

It is easy enough because the way I have personally lived my life has been by a few rules:

Do the least harm to all I meet

I was raised that if you didn’t have anything nice to say, then keep your mouth shut. Over the years I have been able to generalize this. One of my fave quotes is “Even a fish could learn to stay out of trouble if it would keep its mouth shut.”  So very true.

I am usually the one sitting quietly on the side. I try not to say anything unless it brings some value to the conversation.

Disclaimer: If you are close friends or family this does not apply. I will continue to be a silly sing-a-song-that-I-hear-a-beat-to-and not know the words kinda chic.

Any positive moment is movement towards what is positive

Through my early readings I see many sex work advocates upset over legislation that doesn’t address exactly what they want. I keep in mind it is a process, and as long as we are going forward and not backwards, it is a step in the right direction.

This saved my ass when I was repeatedly denied requests I put in (mail with smudges, visits, passes, electronic monitoring, write up appeals…the list could go on). Although the outcome was not what I wanted (usually) I felt I was going forward just by requesting, questioning and trying to be heard, because I did get some answers that weren’t always “no’s”.

Standing together and not bickering amongst ourselves is a step towards change. Wasting time and energy against each other is what those who wish to dispel our cause wants. Ask some of the women I did time with, I was always talking about how we needed to support and be there for each other, not bicker, tell on or ostracize. That is what makes us weak, and by us, I mean women because it has been my personal experience that men call this b.s much sooner and work towards getting things done, not focusing on petty issues.

Tell my truth

Over time my truth has changed. I feel as if I have lived several lives, and you know what? I am okay with that. More than okay. I find my strength in that. It means I have a broader view of the world, of people and most importantly I am open to know myself. After all, I  see life as a journey towards who I authentically am as a person, woman, mother, friend and human. I define my journey, not any one else. I find empowerment through consequence.